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TVET Glossary of Terms


This glossary of terms intends to provide the TESDA key players, partners, and stakeholders an online and updated TVET information, concepts, to bring common understanding and clarification on the use of TESDA terminologies.




CONCEPT/TERM DEFINITION
SKILLS COMPETITION serves as a venue to recognize the skills excellence of young industry skilled workers and graduates of TVET institutions.
Source: -
SKILLS DEVELOPMENT the process through which learners and workers are systematically provided with learning opportunities to acquire upgrade, or both, their ability, knowledge and behavior pattern required as qualifications for a job or range of jobs in a given occupational area.
Source: (RA 7796/TESDA Law)
SKILLS DEVELOPMENT the process through which learners and workers are systematically provided with learning opportunities to acquire upgrade, or both, their ability, knowledge and behavior pattern required as qualifications for a job or range of jobs in a given occupational area.
Source: (RA 7796/TESDA Law)
SKILLS PASSPORT a record of the competencies possessed by a person and recognized through formal assessment.
Source: (NCVER 2013, Australia)
SKILLS PASSPORT a record of the competencies possessed by a person and recognized through formal assessment.
Source: (NCVER 2013, Australia)
SKILLS PRIORITIES list of skills considered critical to the growth of priority sectors and industries at the national, regional and provincial levels.
Source: -
SKILLS PRIORITIES list of skills considered critical to the growth of priority sectors and industries at the national, regional and provincial levels.
Source: -
SKILLS UTILIZATION RATE the proportion (in percent) of employed graduates at the time of survey whose jobs are related to skills acquired to total employed graduates.
Source: (TESDA Study on the Employability of TVET Graduates)
SKILLSPRENEURSHIP a program aims to introduce entrepreneurship to TESDA technical-vocational graduates to explore the path to entrepreneurship as a way to maximize their technical skills and promote family-based enterprises for employment generation
Source: (Building a Nation of Skills-Based Entrepreneurs by Kom Ferrer, 2018)
SOCIO-EMOTIONAL SKILLS

also known as soft skills, non-cognitive skills, or behavioral skills—reflect the worker’s personality, attitude, and mindset. Along with cognitive and technical skills, the development of socioemotional skills is a vital component of an effective employment and competitiveness strategy.

 


Source: (Acosta, et al., 2017).

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